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Protecting the Canal since 1954

Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Association is an independent, all-volunteer citizens organization established in 1954 to help conserve the natural and historical environment of the C&O Canal and the Potomac River Basin. The association works with the National Park Service in its efforts to preserve and promote the 184-mile towpath.
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Hike Saturday at Dam #5

Join Pat White as she leads a Continuing Hike at Feeder Dam #5 10:30 a.m. Saturday (February 24). The group will start at the dam and inlet locks, mile 106.8, and hike upstream to Four Locks.
The 2024 Continuing Hikes are investigating the dams and locks providing water and access to the canal from the Potomac River. Attendees should dress for the weather, bring water and lunch or a snack, and be prepared to walk four to eight miles round trip. Hikes are rain or shine.

For more information contact hikemaster@candocanal.org.
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Hike Saturday at Dam #5

Join Pat White as she leads a Continuing Hike at Feeder Dam #5 10:30 a.m. Saturday (February 24). The group will start at the dam and inlet locks, mile 106.8, and hike upstream to Four Locks.
The 2024 Continuing Hikes are investigating the dams and locks providing water and access to the canal from the Potomac River. Attendees should dress for the weather, bring water and lunch or a snack, and be prepared to walk four to eight miles round trip. Hikes are rain or shine.

For more information contact hikemaster@candocanal.org.

Comment on Facebook

We lived at Four Locks (I was a child), and my mother would make us ride bikes to Little Pool or Dam #5 on the tow path. I rode my bike right off the path and into the Potomac River one time where the tow path went into the river near Dam #5. The current dragged me quite a way. I lost my bike that day, but learned a lot. I was in fourth grade. I really wish I still lived on the canal.

Did you know that the C&O Canal was an important part of the Underground Railroad?

Prior to the abolition of slavery, many enslaved Black people seeking their freedom found temporary work and haven at points along the Canal on their way to free communities such as Washington, D.C. or Pennsylvania. These individuals included slaves the C&O Canal used to build the Canal or people using the river to guide them to freedom. After slavery ended, Black people continued to work on the Canal and in surrounding communities, building their societal and economic independence. However, they also dealt with racism, restrictions on employment opportunities, and violence as the white supremacist reaction to emancipation took hold.

Please click here: bit.ly/4991lMb to learn more about this chapter in Black history.
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Comment on Facebook

I appreciate the link to an academic treatise, and even more the fact that the NPS sponsored such work. The long mural in Cumberland that depicts the history of the region from pre-culumbian times to the 20th century has a scene about the Underground Railroad. In my view it is the most moving scene of the entire mural. Looks like I am not allowed to post photos in the comments but if I could I would post what I’m talking about.

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